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PE: Traditional Shading

Fri Feb 21, 2014, 7:37 AM



Traditional Shading


Hello. This is iDJPanda on the topic of shading! :la:

When I usually start into the shading process of something, I always struggle to see which kind of technique I can use to give the piece of art the type of wow that I want. But just like anything, there are MANY ways to do it! This can help you use different shading techniques for different textures. I'm gonna give you a few different ways you can shade (Try to shake it up! :giggle: ). If you have any other ways you shade, please feel free to tell me! :)

Scribbling


One of my favorite, in this technique of shading, you go against what all elementary teachers told you. You scribble! When you shade like this, you'll come out with something that looks like this.


Using circular motions, you generate different shades. Spending more time, swirling makes the certain areas you want darker, and the less you swirl makes the other areas lighter. :dummy:

Stippling


I consider this one really hard. This type of shading requires you to make dots in order to get shading that you want. Just like the "Scribbling" method. The more you dot in an area, the more darker the area will be. (:



Crosshatching


I LOVE this method. In this type of shading, you create "X" type marks in order to add that three dimensional effect that is being achieved in any kind of shading. 



As you can see, the farther apart the "X"s are, the lighter they will be and the closer you put them together, the more depth it will have. :happybounce:

Slinky


Typically, I use this one with a combination of "Smooth Shading", one that I will talk about below. This one is very simple and can be quickly done without any hassle.
With this method you create a new sense of depth by creating back and forth motions with your pencil, like a slinky! 



Just like all the other times I've told you before, the more you shade for a certain area, the darker it will be. This kind of shading would be better used for sketches to get the gist of what kind of areas need certain amounts of shading.

Smooth Shading


This one is the one I ALWAYS use. :lol: Not because I don't like new things but because it's usually the best type of shading if you are going to a realistic type feel.  You don't only use a pencil with this kind of shading though. You can use tissues, Q-Tips, stumps, or even your fingers! These are all kinds of things that can be used to help blend the dark and light tones together. :love:




With this, you are also able to use a kneaded eraser, a type of eraser if you shade a little too dark or want to have some lighter tones in your piece of art , it removes the pencil nicely because of it's soft features (It's moldable, so you can form it to fit how you want to erase!). This tool is wonderful and I would recommend it over a traditional eraser.

There are tons of ways to add the highs and the lows into your piece of traditional art. Don't limit yourself to one type, try them out or even make your own! And remember to always have fun! =p




Add a Comment:
 
:iconhobbitfan14:
HobbitFan14 Featured By Owner Apr 10, 2015  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is so helpful! Thanks so much for doing this! :D
Reply
:iconninelyn:
Ninelyn Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Wonderful article! Thank you!! :heart:
Reply
:iconclu-art:
Clu-art Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The last method is the least to prefer ;) (Allthough it Looks good)
Reply
:iconidjpanda:
iDJPanda Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014  Student General Artist
Why don't you prefer it?
Reply
:iconclu-art:
Clu-art Featured By Owner Mar 11, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
hard to explain in english...
Smudging, as it is, is not the technique that you should use. While it Looks good it is not as artistically (is this a word?) as the other techniques. One should really use hatching.
Reply
:iconcrazy-and-proud2413:
crazy-and-proud2413 Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2014  Student Photographer
I think I understand. The other techniques look more raw, more natural, and have movement. If just just conveying a still face, for example, expressionless, smooth shading looks almost photorealistic if done well, but expressions and moving objects look better unrefined.
www.deviantart.com/art/Russian…   and  www.deviantart.com/art/Susan-S… as exampes.
Reply
:iconclu-art:
Clu-art Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The first example Shows exactly what I mean. You can create shadows and Highlights with hatching and crosshatching. This will also ad texture to the drawing.
I wish I could draw ;)
Reply
:iconcrazy-and-proud2413:
crazy-and-proud2413 Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2014  Student Photographer
Same : ) I can draw, but nowhere near that standard. Oh, and I wish I had a scanner. My DA stuff is awful because I can't draw digitally...
Reply
:iconclu-art:
Clu-art Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
not sure what scanner you want, but a Basic model should be affordable
Reply
:iconcrazy-and-proud2413:
crazy-and-proud2413 Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2014  Student Photographer
Yeah, I'm still on pocket money. Five pounds a week, and canvasses ( Canveses? canvasi? Whatever...) don't buy themselves.
Reply
(1 Reply)
:iconantjr:
AntJr Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Great tutorial. A+
Challenge yourself and take it one step further. Use all those techniques with a ball point pen. No room for error.
Reply
:iconidjpanda:
iDJPanda Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014  Student General Artist
Thank you! :la:

Oh gosh. That would be interesting. I don't know how you would smooth shade with a pen though. :giggle:
Reply
:iconantjr:
AntJr Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
It's just a matter of pressure. A good rub while the ink is wet never hurt either.
Reply
:iconflashkat7:
FlashKat7 Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I totally needed this. +fav+
Reply
:iconidjpanda:
iDJPanda Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014  Student General Artist
You're welcome. :meow:
Reply
:iconchickadde1:
Chickadde1 Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2014  Student General Artist
What a terrific journal entry for all to read!
I generally use smooth shading =p
Reply
:iconidjpanda:
iDJPanda Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014  Student General Artist
Thank you! c:

Me too. It's probably the easiest for me. :lol:
Reply
:iconastrikos:
Astrikos Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2014   General Artist
Lovely! :la:
Reply
:iconidjpanda:
iDJPanda Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014  Student General Artist
Thank you. c:
Reply
:iconaschiee:
Aschiee Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I love to use the Crosshatching method, even if I fail a lot/it doesn't show up on the camera~
Reply
:iconidjpanda:
iDJPanda Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014  Student General Artist
I can't do crosshatching. It always comes out weird looking for me. :XD:
Reply
:iconmixdouble:
mixdouble Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
Hello Panda...Great Totorial/journal...!

I would like emphasize...
to point out...
the Importance...
the Fysics...
and the Dynamics...
of the shaded marks.

We see it clearly...
in your cross hatching...
but also on your smooth shading:

Some lines follow the form...
some go across...
and some are diagonal.

They are different Means...
They each create different results...!

The lines...the marks...
that Work with or against the form...
are the nost natural.
Cross hatching...
with more than one purpose...!

Cross hatching that is used...
just to get tones...
are more artificial...
more technical.
Much like screen tones or raster...
they create a different "Look"...
a different "Feel".
More distant...more translated...!

The dynamics of your marks...
are chosen...
when you choose your technique...

Enough talking for now...
Early Spring Greetings George...Jakob.
Reply
:iconcrazy-and-proud2413:
crazy-and-proud2413 Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2014  Student Photographer
Wow. Poetry.
Reply
:iconkaz-d:
Kaz-D Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist Photographer
Fantastic! Love the examples :)
Reply
:iconidjpanda:
iDJPanda Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014  Student General Artist
Thank you. :)
Reply
:iconmtn-man:
Mtn-Man Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist

Just wanted to add, as a comic artist(hobbyist) I manly deal with hatching and cross hatching, but when I really want to shade I use a version of scribbling that I've always called the "Circle Blend Technique". Like the name implies, its all about circles. Small ones, circles that can be layered and layered upon to produce a smooth feel. Its almost like smooth shading but with out the need of a blending tool. I'm definitely no professional to any degree but its has worked well even for my skill level. What's Next for Me by Mtn-Man this is the most recent piece I have that uses the technique, its similar to a smoother style but the little circles adds that bit of almost a "noise" effect that I kinda like sometimes.

 

This was a great article and most enlightening and as always, this user is CWI ( commenting while intoxicated ) have a nice day. :ahoy:

Reply
:iconidjpanda:
iDJPanda Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014  Student General Artist
Wow. It looks so smooth! :la: I'll try to try it when I'm doodling. :)

Thank you! 

:lmao: It's okay. If I could drink, I probably would be doing the same thing (probably not on dA though. xD)
Reply
:iconloilie:
Loilie Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
great help!
Reply
:iconmarcgo26:
MarcGo26 Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Man I gotta say I love this! :love:
Reply
:iconmarimariakutsu:
marimariakutsu Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Oh my gosh~
I,m so thankful!
I needed to orient myself with traditional media right now!!!!!
Thank you <3 
Reply
:iconartrefugium:
ArTRefugiuM Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014   Traditional Artist
Nice :) But I do definately not recomment to smooth with your fingers, it leaves bad dark stains that you'll never ever get erased again. I prefer Q-tips, paper stumps and tissues :)
Reply
:iconidjpanda:
iDJPanda Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Student General Artist
I use my fingers a lot and yeah. I don't think it's the best way to shade. It definitely gets to the paper and because of the oils on your fingers, it doesn't come off the paper. I usually put a paper under my arm to prevent any of that. c:
Reply
:iconartrefugium:
ArTRefugiuM Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014   Traditional Artist
I used to use (^_^) my fingers a lot years ago when I began and never had good results. Nowadays I also do use this paper under my hand so that nothing gets smudged where it shall not...
Reply
:iconartrefugium:
ArTRefugiuM Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014   Traditional Artist
+ recommend ... sorry, my fault.
Reply
:iconbrietta-a-m-f:
brietta-a-m-f Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I almost always use the last one as well. I've experimented with all of them before, but only stippling and slinky ever looked remotely right to me. I love the way cross-hatching looks, but I can't seem to get it to work for me. Awesome article, though!
Reply
:iconiingo:
iingo Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I wanted to do a article on that too...sob

BUT YOU GOT IT GOOD!!!!!!!!!! Nice article
Reply
:iconidjpanda:
iDJPanda Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014  Student General Artist
Thank you! 

You can still do it. Just try giving a different view to it! The more articles, the better. :meow:
Reply
:iconxxxscarletkittyxxx:
xxxScarletKittyxxx Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thank you, I believe this may help me to achieve feats! =^_^=
Reply
:iconidjpanda:
iDJPanda Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014  Student General Artist
You're welcome! :la:

I would love to see them! 
Reply
:iconxxxscarletkittyxxx:
xxxScarletKittyxxx Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:)
Reply
:iconemokitten687:
emokitten687 Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Very nice journal! I really like the last one, I'm the type of artist that likes smooth shading.

I actually have an abstract drawing that's a perfect example of it! :)
emokitten687.deviantart.com/ar…
Feel free the check it out! :D
I also like the crosshatching shading, that one is cool too. XD
Reply
:iconidjpanda:
iDJPanda Featured By Owner Mar 10, 2014  Student General Artist
Thank you! 

That looks awesome! I think one time in our art class we had to do something like that. :'P

Crosshatching is soo hard for me. xD
Reply
:iconpenis-jam:
Penis-Jam Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Student General Artist
Crosshatching is really fun. :heart:

One of my favorite ways to shade traditionally is a dark, solid technique like what you see in a lot of comic-styled art such as this: www.copicmarker.com/wp-content…  I'm not sure what you call it, but I love to work with ink-- giving my lines diversity in thickness and connecting all of the edges (that's my own little thing :lol: ).
Reply
:iconddao93:
ddao93 Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I love using the kneaded eraser rather than a regular one. It does help! :D
Reply
:iconbebythemonkey:
BebyTheMonkey Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Student General Artist
I use smooth shading too. I learned it from my teacher. It really does look reallistic when the results are done.
Reply
:iconseas-of-emerald:
Seas-of-Emerald Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
This was very helpful, thank you :D I especially like the crosshatching and the scribbling techniques, and I'll be trying them out in the future :la:
Reply
:iconetsuko-hime:
Etsuko-Hime Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I remember i lernt this at school :D

Reply
:iconsilverhammer:
silverhammer Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Very interesting read :)
Reply
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